Picstitch: Because I’m too lazy to do a proper blogpost…for now.


The weather is cruel at 5 degrees with rain showers and strong gusts of wind so we had to abandon our plans for staying outdoors and doing outdoorsy things. But, we made up for it by spending more time on the dining table and playing hide-and-seek with the adorably cute, incredibly smart, undeniably sweet kids named Raphael and Claire. I mean, seriously, with kids as beautiful as these two, who would need dolls?

All things bright and beautiful...

All creatures great and small...

All things wise and wonderful...

Obviously I’m too lazy to do a proper blogpost so i’m letting these photos do the talking…for now. I’ll be back once i’m properly acclimatized. In the meantime, we have one and a half more days to spend with Chris’ family before we set out on our own Paris adventure. I have said it once before and I’m saying it again: All things considered, I know I got a good man right here. Yes, Salt n’ Pepa, a mighty, mighty good man.:)

 

Paris Rendezvous.


In just a few hours, I will be with C in his home city/country. It’ll be my first time to meet his family and can I just say that I am a ball of shaky nerves right about now? In large part due to the fact that C and I haven’t seen each other for over a month and I’m traveling alone to a foreign country, a continent I’ve never set foot before. And of course, there’s the usual – and perfectly normal, might I add – mixed feelings of excitement and anxiety of meeting my fiance’s family. But they’re nice and sweet I’m pretty sure I’m gonna love them on sight – especially the kids! Speaking of anxiety, I am actually more worried about the weather. C told me it’s still pretty cold in Paris even though it’s spring and sunny during the day. This morning, he said, temperature was 8 degrees. If you know me, then you would know how absurdly low my tolerance is for cold temperatures. And being a tropical baby through and through, I am in perpetual summer mode – hence, my somewhat interesting fashion picks. If I could wear a bikini to work, I don’t think it’ll take much prodding for me to turn up one day in an animal print beach ensemble. I’ll make sure to wear bumblebee shades so no one would recognize me. hahaha.

Anyway, I’m about to board my next flight in a few minutes and really, there’s no better airport one could get stuck in than Changi. I just love, love, love this airport! Everything around here is shiny, pretty, clean, and there’s free wifi everywhere! Just now I wanted to test it by Instagramming while brushing my teeth in the loo but it being inappropriate, never mind that it can still be somewhat funny, I decided against pressing the ‘done’ button. I still am a lady, after all. *wink*

Soon, it’s Paris with my one great love. Can life be any more magical than this? Thank you Lord for the gift of love and commitment.

Travelbug fashion.

Livin' la vida loca.:)

 

I’M A SURVIVOR: My BDM 102 Story


Unlike many other decisions I have made impulsively over the years (some I regret having made but let’s not get into that), joining the Bataan Death March (BDM) 102 was a deliberate one. Except for the timeline, which was rather hard to ascertain because of the nature of my job. Will it be in 2012? 2013? I really couldn’t tell for sure at that time. Late last year, however, I had made my intentions to run BDM 102 known to my runners friends, and of course, Mr. Baldrunner himself, and the feedback were all positive. So when KB Runner signed me up on the last day of BDM 102 application and I eventually got accepted (Note: There are certain criteria to be met for one to get accepted as a BDM race participant), I was 50 percent sure I’d do it – the other half is obviously dependent on my work schedule.

Registered!

2011 ended and while nearly all of the 2012 BDM 102 runners were busy planning for the race and training properly by logging  precious mileage and incorporating heat training into it as well, I was busy working. And working some more. In fact, since 2012 started, I think I was only able to log a total of 40k running mileage and by ultramarathon standards, that is far from ideal. And then I was supposed to be somewhere for a company event on BDM 102 race dates so it didn’t occur to me to make time for some strength training at least. I was prepared to just cut losses and perhaps go at it next year. Next thing I know, our event was moved at a later date which leaves my March 3-4 weekend wide open for some ultrarunning action. By then, I only had three weeks to put together a game plan; look for kindhearted friends willing to be my support crew (whom I have found, praise God!); and psyche myself into BDM mode. Just to make sure my legs are still in good running condition, I joined two 10k races and carbo-loaded. I must say that was the best part of my preparation – EATING. I ate more than my usual amount of food intake, constantly reminding myself each time I would feel guilty that ‘Yeah, i’m going to burn all of it anyway come BDM 102!’ And so I ate like the buffet cart was going to run out soon.

The only time that the enormity of my decision to run BDM this year dawned on me fully was when I attended the Briefing Ceremony and Carbo Loading party two nights before the actual race. Seeing nearly all of the BDM 102 runners there and making a mental note of how strong and capable they all looked, I began to doubt myself. Seriously, what was I thinking?! It’s one thing to do 50k or even 65k and perhaps finish sterlingly (I did so with my two 50k races but DNF’d with my 65k race in Nuvali) BUT 102k is clearly something else! Reylynne and I would find ourselves staring blankly at the projector screen while BR was doing the briefing and clearly not able to put a finger to what it was that we were both feeling at that time. Nervous, unsure, excited, confident are only some of the decipherable emotions at play that night.

2012 BDM 102 Briefing and CLP at Camp Aguinaldo

BDM warriors with Sir Jovie aka Baldrunner, the brains and might behind Bataan Death March

Finally, it was the night before race day. I had been long done shopping maniacally for supplies (thanks, too, in large part to my brother who shared my BDM grocery expenses with me!) and I already have my Reebok gear, Lightwater and VitaminBoost, Smith Optics Pivlock shades, reflectorized vest with lamp from ARC Ph all locked-and-loaded. JJ of my running group Team UNGAS, also gave me some supplies for the race – all of which came in handy, especially the first aid kit. My amazing support crew which I’m sharing with Cris Dela Cruz, consisting of Eric Caramay, Running Atom, and Jennybave were likewise ready to rock and roll. I went to the salon for foot spa hoping it will relax my mind so that I would at least be able to clock-in some decent zzz time. Weirdly enough, I found myself tossing and turning until about 2:30am, playing scrabble on my iPad. It seemed my mind decided to race ahead of me because I would see snippets of various BDM scenarios being played out in my head! I woke up at 6:30am and even though gun start is not until 10:15pm, I couldn’t convince myself to sleep some more. Instead, I spent my time making cheese pimiento sandwiches, boiling eggs, and packing my running gear and accoutrements.

At 4pm, we were on the road to Mariveles, Bataan.

We made a short pitstop at NLEX to have lunch. In my nervousness, I forgot to eat something during the day. Funny story: Just as we were leaving HenLin, we were sandwiched by this small crowd of people having their photos taken with this guy who turned out to be friggin’ Quinton ‘Rampage’ Jackson and I didn’t get a chance to have my photo taken with him because he was quickly whisked away by his posse before I could even reach for my camera or BB! Nakakainis lang!

With my support crew and runner friends.

We reached KM0 in Mariveles, Bataan at around 8:30pm and as much as we wanted to cram sleep, we opted to prepare for the race. Jennybave took pains in taping my feet, especially my toes which are all blister-prone. I had wanted to use my Reebok Zigtech but after the layers of Leukoplast on both feet, the shoes were already a bit tight for me ( I must remember to get a bigger size next time!) and so I wore Claudia instead which was a good size bigger and has had an ultramarathon experience at last year’s 2nd PAU T2N 50k. It’s important that I give my feet some room to breathe given that it’s inevitable that feet will expand due to constant battering during the race. With my running gear all in place, I looked just about ready to head out to war.

‘Ultra Vicky’ says my ARC Ph shirt.:)

At the KM0 marker, ultrarunners gathered and chatted away. Photos were being taken, as well. In just a few minutes, Baldrunner would call everyone to order and he appointed some runners to sing the US, Japan, and Philippine national anthems. And then we were told to move to the starting line for the prayer and gun start.

Dear God, we pray for safety, strength, perseverance, and courage as we conquer Mariveles, Bataan all the way to San Fernando, Pampanga…

At 10:15pm, we were off like a marauding colony of worker ants. Destination: KM 102 marker at San Fernando, Pampanga. Cris, my BDM partner, and I started off strong. Even while taking it very easy in the first 6kms which was a steep uphill climb, we managed to clock-in sub-6 for the first 42km. And just as I was feeling somewhat invincible, I was brought down to earth when I heard my left knee give off a loud click followed by a very sharp pain I had to cry out. It reminded me so much of my trail run in Nuvali where my knees locked and I couldn’t move and I had to be carried back to the start/finish line on a stretcher, bereft of pride. Hello, deja vu. We immediately called on our suport crew to assist me. Bave put cold compress on injured knee and gave my legs a good rubdown. I put my knee support back on and continued running. Just a few kilometers after, my right knee gave a similar jolt. That’s when I got scared and slowly see my BDM 102 dreams fall apart piece by piece. Knee injury at any race is never a good thing. I decided to take Arcoxia to manage the pain. Cris, too, at around the same time, twisted his right ankle. And so it came to be that we were both limping even before we reached KM50.

Oh my knees! (Subtitled: Parang mag-gi-gym ka lang ah!)

At KM48, I was starting to feel very sleepy I felt like a somnambulist. I told Cris that I would need a 10-minute nap once we reach the pitstop if I am to perform well in the second half of the race. And so we both cat-napped and our support crew woke us up in time for us to see the sunlight slowly peeking out of the night skies. To feel better and refreshed, I brushed my teeth, washed my face with Physio Radiance (yes, plugging!), and brushed my hair. JJ also forced me to eat puto and drink coffee to send me on my way. My knees were feeling better but there was no telling when both will go bust again. We knew it was going to be a very sunny morning/afternoon going into Dinalupihan and all the way to San Fernando so I made sure to protect my eyes with Smith Optics Pivlock V90 Max.

Good morning sunshine! With my Reebok cap, play-dri top and shorts, you can always tell I mean some serious running business!

Just when I thought my painful knees were all that I had to manage, my left shoulder also caved-in due to the pressure of swinging my arms for a long period of time. It got so painful I had to beg RA to administer makeshift arm sling just so I can keep it stable and not moving to and fro much which only aggravates the pain. So with my knees and left arm now all in pain, I couldn’t possibly suffer more, right? I mean, Murphy could not possibly be that cruel, surely? WRONG. Because when the sun finally came out, the heat emanating from that cosmically-gargantuan ball of fire nearly burned everything on terra firma, including my skin. I thought all those years of sunbathing in the beaches of Boracay, Phuket, Davao and Bali will give me some advantage but NOTHING could have prepared me for the kind of heat that confronted us from Dinalupihan all the way to KM83 where I nearly passed out – hungry, dehydrated, and burning up!

Check out my cool arm sling!

It was then that I seriously considered throwing in the towel and calling myself a loser. I was too weak and in so much pain to even consider going further. I wanted to quit and probably never show my face at races anymore. I prayed hard for God to give me one last boost and as a testament to just how faithful HE is to his promise of keeping us safe under his care, my boost came in the form of my support crew and running group friends JJ, Leya, and Ambo. They refused to hear my protestations and declaration of surrender and instead, pushed me to give it one more go. In between force-feeding me with fruits, making me drink Oresol, and wrapping my burning skin with very cold towels, they would encourage me to get up and run the remaining distance and lay claim on my BDM 102 trophy. My support crew realized that I have not exactly been eating all this while. I would have a slice of apple, orange, watermelon, and a piece of banana and nothing more. My hydration, also, left a lot to be desired. I would only take a few sips of Lightwater, VitaminBoost, and Pocari and feel as though I’m drowning in my own skin. So weird! At KM83, my apparel were soaked and the heavy fabric of my top and shorts were weighing down on me so I changed into fresh top and running bottoms. I also discarded my knee support and patella band because at that point, the contraptions were impeding blood circulation.

With barely 2 hours left ’til the 18-hour cut-off and still 12kms away, I regained some of my strength and my stride went from power walking to what my support crew surmised to be almost 6:30 pace all the way to the finish line. I took back the lead some of the guys snatched away from me when we were forced to just walk from KM70 because of our injuries and soon after, managed to squeak-in a strong finish with more than half and hour to spare.

Nearly there…

KM 102, come to Mama!

Seeing the FINISH LINE tarpaulin and the runners who crossed way ahead of me, including all the support groups, standing just behind the arch waiting to welcome the finishers was INCREDIBLE! That 500-meter stretch to KM102 was for me the best 500 meters I would ever cross – except maybe when I get married and have to do the same ceremonial crossing, only this time, down the flower-decked aisle and preferably with the feel of powder-soft sand beneath my sandaled feet. *ahem. ahem.*

I FRIGGIN’ MADE IT TO THE FINISH LINE!!!

And here she comes barreling through the odds stacked up against her…Vicky, FTW!!!

It was such an emotional moment for me that I couldn’t contain my tears. I cried and Bave cried with me. I have wanted that BDM 102 trophy and medal since the first time I tried ultrarunning at Mr. Pinatubo and now it’s mine! And I have a laundry list of friends and sponsors to thank for making my BDM 102 dream a reality. Thank you so, so, sooo much! You guys know who you are.:)

Oh, and one more thing. If you ask me what else would I write down as great BDM moment for me, I would have to say — and you gotta keep your mind open about this and your sense of humor ready just in case — those times where I would no longer care where and how I pee. Honest truth! Bear in mind that I was competing against a lot of runners and this is where being a lady is sometimes a disadvantage – but I learned to adjust, adopt, and accommodate. Grassy patch, behind the car, in between car doors, in a dried-out canal, inside a held-out malong — name it, I’ve done it all! But only during night time when it was dark and there were hardly any people around. During the day, I would knock at people’s homes and gasoline stations and beg them to allow me the use of their bathrooms. Those times, I was never without my wet wipes which I would now declare to be among the essentials a female ultrarunner must have when running an all-nighter.

BDM 102 now officially crossed-out of my bucket list! BDM 160 na ba?;)

Pains and killer heat aside, I would say my BDM 102 experience is something I will never EVER forget. On the 3rd of March 2012, I went berserk and made true my dreams of doing the ultimate ultra – not for cash or freebies BUT for pride, honor, glory, and that little kilometer marker trophy I have always wanted to have. I am no longer just a road warrior dreaming dreams of pushing myself the limits, I am a survivor – A BDM SURVIVOR! 

My BDM 102 story.

Thank you REEBOK, ARC Ph, Lightwater and VitaminBoost by Suncoast, Smith Optics, Toby’s, CW-X, Chris Sports, FTW magazine, Team Reebok, Team UNGAS, my fellow BDM-initiate and partner Cris and my amazing support crew! To those who prayed for me and wished me well on my BDM journey, my deepest gratitude as well. We’re all made of WIN!

Postwithoutatitle.


Today’s Facebook status message: Experiment with life – constantly. Do things other than your job and be fulfilled. Balance, you will soon learn, is a matter of logistics.

Places. Faces. Friends.

Zambales Fun Run: That Which Became Woeful In The End


When you have two stories you can’t wait to share –  one is happy and the other is, well, quite the opposite – which one do you tell first? A bit of a pickle, isn’t it? I guess if the intention is to end the storytelling bit on a high note, you serve up the bad stuff first, hoping the bit of  good news would neutralize the jarring effect of the former.

TEAM REEBOK at the Starting Line

So, on to the unpleasant side of things…

Like I said in my previous blog entry here, our trip to Zambales over the weekend was mainly for the 400th Anniversary Fun Run, of which Reebok – our very generous team owner – was one of the sponsors.  Perhaps the one and only good thing that the race offered was the venue, specifically, the race route. For most of us who have gotten used to running the same old running routes in the Metro, the opportunity to take on a new race destination is incentive enough to go all the way to Zambales. Add ten points if you actually get to run on the beach for a third of a kilometer before you move on to the town proper before heading back down to the beach where the start/finish line is. Yes, that part was good.

These days, any race would not be complete without the gazelle-like Kenyans like Will

We woke up at 3:30am knowing that there are seven of us in one room and we would have to queue to use the bathroom and gear up for the race, if we have to make it to the 5:30 gun start for the 21k. It was still dark when we filed out of the room and made our way to the starting line, where the rest of the runners lay in wait.  But alas, it was already an hour past the gun start and we were still behind the line waiting for the real action to start. The runners were getting antsy and why not? We have participated in a lot of races and not a single one of those have made us wait for more than five to ten minutes past the published gun start.

Good call, Kassy!

Kassy made a brilliant call of going onstage and announcing the start of the race. It should have been the race director’s job to ensure that everything is well-organised even before making that call, but in this case, the race director himself needed some directing. After it was announced about 50 times that ‘the race is about to start’,  we were finally doing what we set out to do in Zamba — running! Ohhh weee.

But, whatever disappointment we may have felt at the beginning was quickly overshadowed by the obvious charm of the place. I loved the beach run, although very short, as it reminded me of those times I would run on the powder-soft sandy shores of Boracay. I did 10k with Kassy, Trick, and RunningAtom, along with several other younglings – most of them half my age. Literally.

50 minutes and 40 seconds later, I crossed the finish line. Arguably, my best time yet. I remember back in the days when I would cover 10k in 1hr 2mins or something like that. But now that I am older, I am evidently faster. How cool is that?!? Very.

Smug Smuggerson after placing 5th in the 10k female division

I placed 5th in the 10k female category and of course I felt exceedingly good about it. You would, too, if you’re running alongside 13 to 15-year olds. In my case, I was struggling to keep up with the young sprinters. The first place winner took only 34 minutes to cover the whole 10km stretch. Beat that, Vicky Ras! Uhrrrm, no, I don’t think so. But thank you for the offer. I will get back to you on that in my next life, ya?

After the last 21k runner has crossed the finish line, the organizers were ready to award the winners. And that’s when the drama ensued. THIS JUST IN: Jordan, one of the race event organizers wrote in response to the succeeding statements in my blog entry: Apparently, the runners-up were NOT supposed to get any cash prizes but they demanded for such claiming they traveled miles and hours to get to the race and therefore, deserving of some form of remuneration. Out of the goodness of the organizers’ hearts, they relented. But according to Jordan, instead of feeling grateful, they got greedy and asked for more.  Some of them even went to the Mayor’s office to ask for more dole-outs. If this indeed were the case, then it certainly puts things in a slightly different perspective. Worse, it reflects very negatively on the state that running as an industry is starting to show signs as becoming. Whatever happened to running for fun and health and social reasons? So yes, money was given – and even more – according to Jordan.  Itago na lang natin ito sa pamagat na ‘Ang Nawawalang Mga Pa-premyo’ or ‘The Tale of the Missing Cash Prizes’. We did not stay long enough to investigate as it was not in our place to do so anyway, but there were runners – young aspiring athletes – who were robbed of their cash prizes. One girl who was supposed to receive P5,000 only got P500. Now I don’t know about you guys but that to me is more heartbreaking than my first breakup. Much worse even if you consider how these kids have commuted from several towns and kilometers away to take a shot at the prize money and actually nailing it on the head…only to find the envelope containing only 10 percent of the published amount. THAT. IS. CRUEL. AND. INHUMANE. How are we supposed to inspire our young and talented but underprivileged athletes when some of us have no compunction – AT ALL – about dousing their fire even before it has had time to burst into flames? What do you say to these kids in their inconsolable state? Pasensiya na iha, ganyan talaga sa totoong buhay. Parati kang maiisahan kaya masanay ka na. Is that our way of telling them to just deal with it?

Me being me (is that even grammatically sound?!?), I am very quick to see the merit in things especially when crucial details are being put forward. Like I told Jordan, a lot of things did not exactly unravel the way they should (have) during that race event such that there were very loose ends at the beginning, during and especially after the race that were not exactly tied to perfection. I, too, come from an events management background which greatly explains why I tend to be very thorough in looking into details. Add to that my propensity to be obsessive-compulsive by nature, then holy moly, you have a weirdo in your midst!

No, but seriously, I’d like to personally thank Jordan for coming forward with his side of the story. As event organizers, I’m sure they have the greatest intentions for the race and the runners and perhaps it was just unfortunate that the outcome was not exactly what they had envisioned.  At the end of the day, I am blogger who calls it as I see it and if my being brutally honest with my thoughts has caused some people some measure of pain and discomfort, then I am sorry.

Now going back to runners who run purely for monetary reasons: can we blame them entirely for being too brutally honest in their intentions for doing what they do? This clearly runs deeper than what can be seen on the surface. A social illness, if you may. People do not have enough resources to tide them over for a day, a week, or maybe for months even that they resort to unconventional means to earn extra – such as emotionally blackmailing race organizers, for example to shell out more. It’s sad isn’t it? One day, when I am rich – and I mean filthy, disgustingly, inappropriately rich – three segments of the society will rank high on my priority list: the abandoned children, the elderly, and the underprivileged athletes.

But as promised, I will try not to leave you in that state of sadness and disbelief at other people’s beastly behavior. Because there, in fact, were one or two more good things that happened that day. Beep Beep, our Reebok teammate, placed 7th overall in the 21k race category. Titanium Runner, Alex, and Kassy all got good time for their respective race categories. Our guests RunningAtom and Trickoy also did very well at the race.

Now the other good, nay, great thing that happened that day was meeting the legendary and controversial Nancy Navalta. People my age and older would remember Nancy as the very promising heir-apparent to Lydia de Vega in the early 1990s. Nancy was fast, very fast, on the track and for a moment there, she seemed almost unstoppable. Until she was forced to undergo gender determination tests, which said that she was “genetically male.”  The Philippine Sports Commission instructed Navalta to compete as a male or to undergo “corrective measures.” The ruling effectively ended Navalta’s competitive career. It was a sad say for the Philippine running community but it must have been a million times heartbreaking for Nancy herself. I was in my teens when Nancy was all the media could talk about and I never thought the day would come when I would actually see her in person. I mean I was awestruck when I saw Lydia de Vega three times at the PhilSports Arena track and I remember she even said ‘ang ganda mo naman’ when I smiled at her one time (Thank you, by the way Idol Lydia! You don’t know me from Eve but I will forever remember that compliment you paid me that forgotten morning at ULTRA) But this, this right here is Nancy Navalta, arguably one of the most controversial Filipino athletes in history and even at present time.

With the sensational Nancy Navalta

Nancy, today, serves as the Athletics Coach of the University of Luzon. Those teenage girls that beat the crap out of me in the 10k division – they were Nancy’s ward. Perhaps if I were coached by Nancy, I would be running waaaaay faster than I do now. Yes, even with my 32-year-old knees. From what I’ve heard, Nancy is actively involved in promoting inter-barangay track competitions where, she says, we can find runners of Olympics caliber – especially those in the out-of -school youth (OSY) segment.

So how about we help Nancy help the struggling young athletes out there? Think about it. And one day, when you have made the decision to help, do it unquestioningly.

Having said that, I still want to end this post in a crescendo of good vibrations so how about I post some more photos of myself (I love to talk about myself so better get used to it!) and Team Reebok as we bring our Zamba trip to a worthy end?

REEBOK is Pro Active Lifestyle

Crash diet and starvation are a No-NO!

From running to beach bumming

To making friends...Hi, Will!

Goofing around with Kassy

Oh look at that, a little bit more of me...

...and me.

OKAY. This unabashed display of over-the-top self-love has got to stop. Vicky, you are out. TEAM REEBOK, paaaaaaasok!

Weeet...weeew!

SURFING: Another Item X-marked On My Bucket List


‘Whatever’s bound to happen is already happening…’ or something to that effect. Thus says my on-again, off-again friend earlier today, probably in reference to the latest thing I jumped right into over the weekend. SURFING. Yes, the kind that involves a surf board and  real waves, and me, making countless attempts to ride them.

Brown Surfer Girl.

But first, allow me to thank form the bottom of my heart, the group that keeps me motivated in staying true to my commitment of living a healthy, fit, and active lifestyle; the same group whom I have been running road races lately. Individually, we are as diverse as can be – but when it comes to things that matter such as passion, friendship, commitment, and going that extra mile to help others, we are one and the same. TEAM REEBOK, we rock and we know it!

TEAM REEBOK and friends conquered the waves the day before the race

Surfing was not part of the agenda when on Saturday, the 11th of June, our group (along with friends Dietrich and Running Atom) hied-off to Iba, Zambales for the Fun Run organised to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the municipality. Kassy said there was no forecast of waves in the area and so we may have to settle for swimming or sunbathing in my case, being the only non-swimmer in the group. I said, very well, I could live with that. But when we got there, whoa, the sea painted an entirely different picture from the forecast. The waves were surfable! Not one to waste time, Kassy immediately asked the locals where we can rent boards and if there’s someone who can give me crash course on surfing. Within minutes after checking in to our room, Kassy and I changed into our swimsuits, and I was getting very rough tips on how to mount the board and pop. My fear of water has certainly got in the way of my learning how to swim. For some reason, I get all panicky when water has come up to my neck and I would lose grip of my courage. I am one brave little monster but I draw the line when it comes to things that defy defy depths or heights. Oh but having done scuba diving and surfing nearly back-to-back, am I now to expect bungee jumping, paragliding, or cliff jumping in the near offing?!? Holy guacamole, pass me the barf bag, I’m feeling sick!!!

Grabbing life by the leg.

That must have been the reason why I found it rather difficult at first to pop, coming from a horizontal position on the surf board. My minds keeps telling me I would fall within nanoseconds and true enough, I did. Proving once again the extent of our mind’s power: I think, therefore I am. In my case, I thought I would not be able to stand up and float away and I did fail in my first few attempts. But I got tired of landing on the right side of my ass (which at that time was already starting to feel tender and not in a good way!), so I said ‘Eff it, I am gonna do this!’ And next thing I know, I was already doing this:

Oh but she can ride it!

and this…

Vicky and Kassy conquer Zamba waves

It was so much fun that for a second there I did not quite believe Kassy when she said I will feel the burn on my shoulders and thighs the following day. For how can something so good be painful at the same time? Uhrrrm, Vicky darling, there are actually quite a looot of good things that are painful in equal measure and you know that. Uhmm-kaaay, point well taken. I chipped a toe nail, too, and my nail polish got ruined but these things all seem inconsequential (I mean they really are, anyway) when pitted against the mad high I got out of actually being able to stay vertical for a few seconds on top of a moving surf board. Never mind that the waves were not as gloriously high as the 8-foot wall, for example, that experienced surfers prefer. Never mind all that, because on that day in Iba, Zambales, I became little brown surfer girl.

Again, thank you sooo much Kassy!

Partners in Girly Crimes

Tomorrow, I will tell you a little bit about the Fun Run – in which Aunty Vicky attempted to race against girls half her age and ended up feeling vindicated. I may be 32 next month but my speed, agility, and curves say otherwise. Keep tuned-in, loves!

Movies: 16th French Film Festival


Because I said I didn’t want to be the typical chameleon of a girlfriend who couldn’t wait to suddenly speak French, (I’m a non-conformist, indulge me!) I have decided to put-off learning the language for wee bit longer. But now I’m thinking it’s juvenile and rather stupid of me because French is a beautiful language and I could really use it when I go to Ivory Coast! ROTFLMSAO!

I still know only a few words and phrases, all of which are not meant to be uttered to anyone else but mon amour, but one day soon I will be speaking like an adopted Frenchie.

But for now, this just about how French-y I can get: The much-awaited 16th French Film Festival returns to the Philippines this month and delightfully bringing to Filipino audiences a mix of some of the best and latest action, adventure, comedy, drama and documentary films from France today.

Opening Night: June 8, 6:30 p.m. at Shangri-La Plaza Mall
Manila: June 8-19 at the Shangri-La Plaza Mall

16th French Film Festival

Except for that one time I watched Amélie a looong time ago, I don’t recall ever going to another French Film Festival after that so this one’s going to be special. I hope some of my very dear friends can come and watch with me, as they are usually more ‘cultured’ than I am. hahaha. Paging Noel, Gil, Mark, Cris, Eric, Abi, Kassy and Abby – tara lets! Wait, how do you say that in French?